Small Batch BIAB

1-gallon BIAB | Small batch Brew-in-a-Bag

Interested in brewing with just one pot and no strainer?

The Brew-in-a-Bag method is for you

After years of practice, that’s now the only way I brew

The method started in Australia and has now gained so much popularity, it may well be the most popular technique among homebrewers

Basically, instead of having to separate the wort from the grain at the end of the mash in a complicated way or another, you just lift the bag and you are left with the wort ready to boil
Simple, clean, effective, what more can you ask for?

This is my BIAB setup

1-gallon BIAB

  • 10Qt (10L) IKEA pot
  • 5 Gal mash bag US | CAN | UK
  • False bottom (on the right) to prevent the bag from burning. This one comes from my steam cooker. Not sure it’s necessary, but I never dared to try without. If you don’t mash-out, you don’t need it
  • 12″ (30 cm) grill to let the bag sit on the pot while it’s draining. Not necessary, but cool if you happen to have one. This one comes from a grill. You can also use things like this or this


Just mash the way you normally do (see recipe below), but with the grain in the bag

After 1 hour, lift the bag and squeeze it a little bit. Pour about 1 Gal (3.8L) of hot water on the bag for a minimalistic sparge. Finish your brewing as you would normally do

1 gallon BIAB recipe

You can give a try to this recipe which will give you a superb IPA (you can, of course, also use it with your standard brewing method)

1-Gallon


Crush, or buy already crushed, these amounts of grain

2 lb Pale Ale
2.67 oz Carared
1.33 oz Crystal 45°L

Heat 0.67 Gal of water to 160°F
Pour the crushed grain, stir well, REMOVE the pot from the heat, check the temperature to make sure you are as close as possible to 152-153°F, adjust if necessary (this is a fantastic thermometer US|CAN|UK), ideally place a blanket on and around the pot and leave it so for 1 hour

After a 1 hour mash, mash-out by raising the temperature to 170°F and leave it there for 5 minutes

Lift the bag and squeeze a little bit

Add 1 gallon of hot water (from your tap) to the wort, preferably by pouring it onto the bag containing the grain for some sparging

(Note: your best bet to clean the bag is to turn it inside out and rinse it with a shower)

Bring to a boil

Hops shopping-list

1.37oz Nugget
2.9oz Amarillo
2.9oz Centennial
1.5oz Columbus Tomahawk
1.5oz Simcoe

When the boil starts, remove the lid, reduce heat halfway down and add 1.37oz Nugget

10 minutes before the end of the boil, add 1.37oz of Amarillo and the same of Centennial

At the end of the boil (= after 1 hour), chill the wort just a little bit down to about 180°F, add 1.37oz of Amarillo and the same of Centennial, Columbus Tomahawk, Simcoe and cover the pot with the lid and blanket and leave it at this temperature (~180°F) for 15 minutes, this is called “steep hopping” and it’s one of the best methods for hop utilization

After 15 minutes, finish chilling your wort down to 70-73°F
Sanitize your fermenter
Transfer the wort to the fermenter
Pitch 1/4 pack of US-05
Shake your fermenter vigorously for 5 minutes
Place a sanitized stopper and blow-off tube or a bubbler

Let ferment for 10 days in a dark place at 66°F (64°F is even better)
After 10 days, carefully open the fermenter and add 0.15oz of each of the following hops: Amarillo, Centennial, Columbus Tomahawk, Simcoe. This is called “dry hopping” and it’s a great technique for aromatic hops
Close the fermenter back again and let ferment for another 4 days

Bottle with minimal oxygenation and with 0.7oz of table sugar for priming

Leave the bottles in a dark place at room temperature 68-72°F for 3 weeks

Refrigerate overnight

Enjoy!

From then on, try to store your beers at the lowest temperature possible (but not below freezing) in order to preserve their hoppy flavors, or, more simply, drink them quickly!

5 liters


Crush, or buy already crushed, these amounts of grain

1.19 kg Pale Ale
100g Carared
50g Caramünich EBC 120

Heat 3.35L of water to 71°C
Pour the crushed grain, stir well, REMOVE the pot from the heat, check the temperature to make sure you are as close as possible to 66-67°C, adjust if necessary (this is a fantastic thermometer US|CAN|UK), ideally place a blanket on and around the pot and leave it so for 1 hour

After a 1 hour mash, mash-out by raising the temperature to 78°C and leave it there for 5 minutes

Lift the bag and squeeze a little bit

Add 4L of hot water (from your tap) to the wort, preferably by pouring it onto the bag containing the grain for some sparging

(Note: your best bet to clean the bag is to turn it inside out and rinse it with a shower)

Bring to a boil

Hops shopping-list

5g Nugget
15.5g Amarillo
15.5g Centennial
10.5g Columbus Tomahawk
10.5g Simcoe

When the boil starts, remove the lid, reduce heat halfway down and add 5g Nugget

10 minutes before the end of the boil, add 5g of Amarillo and the same of Centennial

At the end of the boil (= after 1 hour), chill the wort just a little bit down to about 82°C, add 5g of Amarillo and the same of Centennial, Columbus Tomahawk, Simcoe and cover the pot with the lid and blanket and leave it at this temperature (~82°C) for 15 minutes, this is called “steep hopping” and it’s one of the best methods for hop utilization

After 15 minutes, finish chilling your wort down to 21-23°C
Sanitize your fermenter
Transfer the wort to the fermenter
Pitch 1/4 pack of US-05
Shake your fermenter vigorously for 5 minutes
Place a sanitized stopper and blow-off tube or a bubbler

Let ferment for 10 days in a dark place at 19°C (18°C is even better)
After 10 days, carefully open the fermenter and add 5.5g of each of the following hops: Amarillo, Centennial, Columbus Tomahawk, Simcoe. This is called “dry hopping” and it’s a great technique for aromatic hops
Close the fermenter back again and let ferment for another 4 days

Bottle with minimal oxygenation and with 26g of table sugar for priming

Leave the bottles in a dark place at room temperature 20-22°C for 3 weeks

Refrigerate overnight

Enjoy!

From then on, try to store your beers at the lowest temperature possible (but not below freezing) in order to preserve their hoppy flavors, or, more simply, drink them quickly!

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Brewer

Brewer

Passionate about beer brewing, I try a new recipe every other week and share my experiences in the blog section with my faithful readers
Brewer

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